In Style: Vintage Denim

GRACE KNUTSEN

There’s a real revolution happening right now, that of vintage denim, and it isn’t a result of tapping into the periodic #TBT look on social media. In fact, vintage denim seems to be making a real style comeback – it’s a new season for an old wardrobe staple.

My love for vintage denim stems from finding an old stash of denim jeans from my mom’s high school years. This treasure trove of old denim included classic “mom” jeans, button down skirts, and high-waisted shorts and skorts. The stockpile of vintage denim transported me back to a time before I was born – the 90’s – compliments of Guess, Lawman, Bongo, and Esprit.

Vintage denim seems to be today’s go-to style trend for a variety of reasons. First, the old-school method of weaving denim from last century, which used a weaving process known as selvedge, created deep, saturated colors resulting in better denim fade, while magically leaving denim feeling both softer and more durable.

Further, vintage denim has its own character, avoiding the phenomenon of mass production otherwise seen throughout the hallowed halls of high school. Not only does every rip, crease, and fray tell a story, but one of the biggest appeals of vintage denim is in knowing my jeans are unique, not to be found in the closets of my fellow classmates.

Just as importantly, vintage denim is an environmentally friendly “reuse and recycle” fashion trend. Rather than buying a new pair of denim jeans that require hundreds of gallons of water and dangerous chemicals to get the distressed look just right, up-cycled denim is distressed naturally, through years of wash and wear.

In addition to being environmentally conscious, vintage denim has unique character rarely seen in new denim jeans today. Whether buying vintage denim is a trend, or merely a passing nod to the 90’s, by re-discovering the virtues of gently used denim from an earlier generation, there are many reasons to add this old-school fashion trend to your wardrobe.

 

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